Remember that one time we almost didn’t see the Sistine Chapel?

dave:

This is from my daughter, who was just in Rome and by this time just left for Ethiopia. Thanks Krystiana, for writing a little about your experiences.

Originally posted on Brim-Full with Immensity of Life:

That’s what we’ll say to each other ten years from now. And we’ll nod and laugh and then we’ll tell the story to whoever will listen, and maybe we’ll embellish a little more each year, but maybe not, because it’s a pretty good story as it is.

Saturday, July 19 2014, 2:30pm.
We’ve just checked in to our unexpectedly lovely bed & breakfast in Rome, and set down with maps and lists and the internet to decide what to do with the wealth of a whole afternoon. We find out the Vatican museum is closed on Sundays, and we’ve waited twenty years and 4000 miles to see the Sistine Chapel, which makes the decision pretty easy. We look up bus routes.

2:50pm
We learn that, although the museum is open till 6, the ticket office closes at 4pm. We gather our things, exit the hotel, and run to what we…

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Palmer St. Podcast: Whole-Hearted Commitment

I have begun everything with the idea that I could succeed, and I never had much patience with the multitudes of people who are always ready to explain why one cannot succeed.
– Booker T. Washington (1856–1915)

Joshua 14.mp3

Joshua 14.pdf

Joshua 14.pptx

 

Palmer St. Podcast: Count on Me to Own It (Paul Velazquez)

The time had come for Joshua to take over the leadership from Moses.  There were new challenges and giants ahead.  Joshua now had to fully own his beliefs and the position he had inherited.

Joshua 1.1-9.mp3 (Paul Velazquez)

Palmer St. Podcast: Mission Accomplished

Lessons from the Life (and Death) of Moses: Moses didn’t accomplish his final goal, which was to enter the Promised Land of Canaan, but he left behind a positive, godly legacy.

Deuteronomy 34.mp3

Deuteronomy 34.pdf

Deuteronomy 34.pptx

Honest Q & A: Church (1) – Liturgy, or Not?

A few of the questions submitted in Honest Q & A have fallen within the very general category of church. Here’s the first question in this category:

What is the appropriate balance between the conflicting trends in the church of the return to tradition (“liturgy is hip,” etc.) and the disillusionment with any kind of structure at all (“church is just people”)?

To give a short, pithy answer, we might say that the appropriate balance is to “make sure we are striving for balance.” Period. For those with the patience for something far less succinct, that answer can be explained. It hinges on the fact that both sides in this discussion have strengths and weaknesses to keep in mind.

In one sense, liturgy, meaning “a prescribed form or set of forms for public religious worship” (Houghton-Mifflin), or the lack thereof, is a neutral issue. We might suppose, therefore, that we can do whatever we want. The Bible doesn’t demand a great deal of liturgy or any particular type. This can be deceiving. Self-deceiving, in fact.

The problem rests in our motivation. Some people are prompted to exquisite heights of worshipful delight via more formal practices and surroundings. Others, in the same setting, feel inauthentic. They need something considerably more “homey” to get the same vibe.   It’s when liturgy turns into “mere” formality that it becomes a cover for hypocrisy. And, let’s face it, saying “church is just people” can be misleading, since church also includes God and the awe we should rightly have in his presence.

We may find the answer to our question in Acts 2:42, “And they devoted themselves to the apostles’ teaching and fellowship, to the breaking of bread and the prayers” (ESV). The worship and practice of the earliest church was admittedly not very formal, but it was not “without form and void.” If these things mentioned are in place and are sincerely practiced, infused with the power of the Holy Spirit, then all should be well. It’s when we cast off all restraint in the name of authenticity, or adopt liturgy to create a religious feel and then confuse that with an actual love of God that we get into trouble.

Palmer St. Podcast: Trading Places

The Bible is all connected.  It’s a story that gives other stories meaning beyond themselves.  It’s a huge story that ultimately includes us.

Deut 21.18-23.mp3

Deut 21.18-23.pdf

Deut 21.18-23.pptx

Palmer St. Podcast: Slaves Forever

 

“We are the Lord’s slaves after having become the Lord’s freemen. He delivers us from the slavery of sin, and then he introduces us to his service. And lo, we find it so blessed that we insist on our ears being bored, and our being made his slaves forever. Now obedience is the slavery of love.” – R. M. Edgar

Deut15.12-18.mp3

Deut 15.12-18.pdf

Deut 15.12-18.pptx